Is a charango a guitar?

2020-01-11 by No Comments

Is a charango a guitar?

One of the most popular Andean musical instruments is a small guitar with five double strings that looks like a Spanish bandurria.

How is the charango tuned?

The basic charango has five pairs (or courses) of strings, typically tuned GCEAE. This tuning, disregarding octaves, is similar to the typical C-tuning of the ukulele or the Venezuelan cuatro, with the addition of a second E-course. Unlike most other stringed instruments, all ten strings are tuned inside one octave.

What is the point of a seven string guitar?

The seven-string guitar adds one additional string to the more common six-string guitar, commonly used to extend the bass range (usually a low B) or also to extend the treble range.

Where did the charango musical instrument come from?

The charango is a small Andean stringed instrument of the lute family, which probably originated in the Quechua and Aymara populations in the territory of the Altiplano in post-Colonial times, after European stringed instruments were introduced by the Spanish during colonialization.

Where did the concheras or charango come from?

Concheras (also has armadillo back) The charango is a small Andean stringed instrument of the lute family, which probably originated in the Quechua and Aymara populations in the territory of the Altiplano in post-Colonial times, after European stringed instruments were introduced by the Spanish during colonialization.

Where did the charango Indians get their name?

The first published historic information on the charango may be that gathered by Vega, going back to 1814, when a cleric from Tupiza documented that “the Indians used with much enthusiasm the guitarrillos mui fuis… around here in the Andes of Bolivia they called them Charangos”.

What kind of shell is a charango made out of?

Traditionally a charango was made with a dried armadillo shell for the back and wood for the soundbox top, neck etc. While still common, this is no longer the norm: rather they are now typically made of wood, with the bowled back merely imitating the shape of the armadillo shell.